Gina Londino

Senior Lecturer, Forensic Chemistry, Chemistry

Education

Senior Lecturer, Forensic Chemistry, Chemistry
Education
B.S., Chemistry, Ball State University, 2004
M.S., Analytical Chemistry, Purdue University Indianapolis, 2006
Editorial
I currently maintain all the instruments and microscopes used in the forensic teaching laboratories, which include GCMS, Pyrolysis GC, FTIR, UV-Vis NIR MSP, Raman, GRIM, and multiple types of microscopes. I also inventory all the teaching supplies used in all the forensic science courses and laboratories.
Teaching Assignments
FIS 10101: Investigating Forensic Sciences; this is a laboratory course developed to provide hands on laboratory experiences in forensic science for all majors. This course was first developed in Fall of 2013 and is not connected to any current lectures.
FIS 20500: Concepts in Forensic Science 1; this is a Gateway course for forensic science majors; however, half the students that register are non-science majors. This course was developed in Fall of 2007 and covers multiple areas in forensic science including case examples from real forensic scientists. This course has both a face to face section and an online section.
FIS 20600: Concepts in Forensic Science 2; this is a continuation of FIS 20500 first developed in Spring of 2008. This course covers more specific types of commonly found evidence, such as illicit drugs, blood spatter, and fire debris. This course has both a face to face section and an online section.
FIS 30600/50600: Forensic Microscopy; this course focuses on how microscopes are used in a forensic laboratory at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This course was first developed in Fall of 2010 and is largely a laboratory course.
Current Research
I am currently interested in course and laboratory development. I mainly focus on forensic science topics and the different methods that can be used in introducing material. Many of my courses highly use online tools to learn information about a given topic; these are then shared with students in small groups in a forum discussion group or through an individual reflection writing assignment.
I have also done work with developing methods of analyzing illicit drugs via GCMS and Raman; as well as microscopy techniques and learning methods.
Select Publications
G. Londino, K Mirakovits. "The Basics of Investigating Forensic Science a Laboratory Manual" CRC Press (2016).
K. Mauser, J. Sours, J. Banks, R. Newbrough, T. Janke, L. Shuck, L. Zhu, G. Ammerman, and P. Varma-Nelson. “Cyber Peer-Led Team Learning (cPLTL): Development and Implementation” Educause Quarterly, 34 (2011).

Editorial

I currently maintain all the instruments and microscopes used in the forensic teaching laboratories, which include GCMS, Pyrolysis GC, FTIR, UV-Vis NIR MSP, Raman, GRIM, and multiple types of microscopes. I also inventory all the teaching supplies used in all the forensic science courses and laboratories. 

Teaching Assignments

FIS 10101: Investigating Forensic Sciences; this is a laboratory course developed to provide hands on laboratory experiences in forensic science for all majors. This course was first developed in Fall of 2013 and is not connected to any current lectures.
FIS 20500: Concepts in Forensic Science 1; this is a Gateway course for forensic science majors; however, half the students that register are non-science majors. This course was developed in Fall of 2007 and covers multiple areas in forensic science including case examples from real forensic scientists. This course has both a face to face section and an online section.
FIS 20600: Concepts in Forensic Science 2; this is a continuation of FIS 20500 first developed in Spring of 2008. This course covers more specific types of commonly found evidence, such as illicit drugs, blood spatter, and fire debris. This course has both a face to face section and an online section.
FIS 30600/50600: Forensic Microscopy; this course focuses on how microscopes are used in a forensic laboratory at both the undergraduate and graduate level. This course was first developed in Fall of 2010 and is largely a laboratory course.

Current Research

I am currently interested in course and laboratory development. I mainly focus on forensic science topics and the different methods that can be used in introducing material. Many of my courses highly use online tools to learn information about a given topic; these are then shared with students in small groups in a forum discussion group or through an individual reflection writing assignment.


I have also done work with developing methods of analyzing illicit drugs via GCMS and Raman; as well as microscopy techniques and learning methods.

Select Publications

G. Londino, K Mirakovits. "The Basics of Investigating Forensic Science a Laboratory Manual" CRC Press (2016).


K. Mauser, J. Sours, J. Banks, R. Newbrough, T. Janke, L. Shuck, L. Zhu, G. Ammerman, and P. Varma-Nelson. “Cyber Peer-Led Team Learning (cPLTL): Development and Implementation” Educause Quarterly, 34 (2011).