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Courses

GEOL-G 107 Environmental Geology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: With Environmental Geology, you have the choice of taking an online section or an on-campus section. The online sections are taught using similar material and are delivered entirely online through Canvas. Environmental geology examines the intersection of geology and humanity---how humans are affected by earth processes (natural disasters), how humans use or modify earth material or ecosystems (wetlands, soils, mining), and how humans impact natural environments (waste disposal, pollution). The course also covers basic concepts like geologic time, plate tectonics, and the rock cycle. Depending on your instructor, common topics covered include:
    • Global warming and climate change
    • Sewage treatment and landfills
    • Air and water pollution
    • Groundwater and surface water resources
    • Ecosystems and their relationship to earth material
    • Earthquakes and Volcanoes
    • Floods and landslides
    • Mining earth resources
  • The class typically includes a required writing assignment, either a service learning experience and follow-up paper, or a research paper.There is an optional independent laboratory section offered with this course, G117.
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerII
  • Instructors: Pierre-Andre Jacinthe , Lani Pascual, Thomas Rossbach 

GEOL-G 110 Physical Geology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: With Physical Geology, you have the choice of taking an online section or an on-campus section. The online sections are taught using similar material and are delivered entirely online through Canvas.
  • Physical geology provides the basis for moving towards advanced geology courses; however, many non-science students take this course out of a general interest in geology. This class will answer your questions about "How does the Earth work" This course covers basic principles of geologic time, earth materials, and plate tectonics in more detail than other 100 level courses. The course surveys a variety of processes that impact the shape and features of Earth's surface. Depending on your instructor, you will cover some of these topics on how Earth processes/features work:
    • Deserts
    • Mountains
    • Rivers
    • Soils
    • Groundwater
    • Glaciers
    • Shorelines
    • Volcanoes
    • Earthquakes
  • By the end of the course, you will understand not only how these features happen, but why we find them in certain locations. If you are interested in an independent laboratory with this course, consider enrolling in GEOL-G 120.
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerI
  • Instructors: Lin Li, Jennifer Nelson, Broxton Bird, Thomas Rossbach   

GEOL-G 115 Introduction to Oceanography

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: With Oceanography, you have the choice of taking an online section or an on-campus section. The online sections are taught using similar material and are delivered entirely online through Canvas.You may know 70% of Earth is covered by oceans, and this class covers all the "behind the scenes" features that go on in our ocean environments. Our oceans have an enormous impact on climactic and weather patterns, and they have helped shape the surface of the Earth (many rocks found in Indiana were deposited in ocean basins). This class starts by covering how the oceans are studied by scientists and how the Theory of Plate Tectonics has shaped the oceans over geologic time. Common topics include common ocean deposits and features, ocean sub-environments like reefs, and the unique characteristics and behavior of ocean water, sediments, and life. Depending on your instructor, the following topics may be covered:
    • Classifying sediments
    • Atmospheric and Oceanic interactions
    • Climate
    • Paleooceanography (Ocean history)
    • Ocean Circulation
    • Tides and Waves
    • Oceanic Life
    • Coastlines
    • Ocean Pollution and Management
  • There is no laboratory associated with the Oceanography course. The class typically includes a required writing assignment, either a service learning experience and follow-up paper, or a research paper.
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerII
  • Instructors: Kathy Licht, Jennifer Nelson, William P Gilhooly III  

GEOL-G 117 Environmental Geology Laboratory

  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Course Summary: This course is the laboratory companion to G107. This is a separate 1 credit course that operates independently from the lecture section. It provides practical laboratory experiences related to practicing Environmental Geology.  The lab uses a mixture of written exercises, maps, and hands-on activities. Specific topics that may be addressed include:
    • Identify and classify the most common types of minerals and rocks, with emphasis on rocks found in Indiana.
    • Use a soil survey and identify the basic properties of soils
    • Learn how to use topographic maps to read elevations and identify common landforms
    • Use topographic maps and Geographic Information Systems to describe and interpret Earth's surface (exogenic) processes: weathering/soils, mass wasting, rivers, cultural features, and groundwater.
    • Practice analytical techniques, including to analyze water chemistry for common pollutants and to interpret seismic data to locate an earthquake.
  • A laboratory textbook and the ability to use basic math skills are required in this course. Exercises are provided early on in the course to practice applying math.
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerII
  • Instructors: Kathy Licht, Jennifer Nelson, William P Gilhooly III  

GEOL-G 120 Physical Geology Laboratory

  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Course Summary: This course is the laboratory companion to G120. This is a separate 1 credit course that operates independently from the lecture section. It provides practical laboratory experiences related to practicing Physical Geology.  The lab uses a mixture of written exercises, maps, and hands-on activities. Specific topics that may be addressed include:
    • Identify and classify the most common types of minerals and rocks.
    • Use a soil survey and identify the basic properties of soils
    • Learn how to use topographic maps to read elevations and identify common landforms
    • Practice analytical techniques, including to analyze water chemistry for common pollutants and to interpret seismic data to locate an earthquake.
  • A laboratory textbook and the ability to use basic math skills are required in this course. Exercises are provided early on in the course to practice applying math.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerI

GEOL-G 130 Short Courses in Earth Science (topic varies)

  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Course Summary: Five-week courses on a variety of topics in the earth sciences. Each short course is one credit; no topic may be taken for credit more than once. Students may take one, two, or all three short courses for 1 credit each. Courses include traditional lectures, homework assignments, writing assignments, and exams. Past topics include:
    • Global Warming
    • Mars and Beyond
    • Urban Agriculture: Water Quality
    • Antarctic Geology
    • Dinosaurs
    • Geology of National Parks
    • Gemstones
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring
  • Instructors: Gabriel Filippelli, Kathy Licht, Jennifer Nelson, Thomas Rossbach   

GEOL-G 132 Environmental Problems

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: This course is provides experience in addressing some of the kinds of problems that arise in studies of the environment. Particular attention is given to developing skills in evaluating scientific articles; specifically, the relevance of the information in an article, the credibility of the author, and the accuracy and usefulness of the quantitative information provided. The kinds of problems considered in this course will vary from semester to semester, but will be chosen from a list that includes global warming, tropical rain forests, acid rain, water pollution, solid waste disposal, appropriate use of land, and the ability of regulations to protect the environment. Three or four such topics will be covered each semester.
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring
  • Instructors: Lani Pascual 

GEOL-G 135 Indiana Geology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Indiana Geology is offered as an online class only, delivered through Canvas. Optional field trips are offered. This course covers a variety of topics that will help you understand basic concepts of physical geology through a study of Indiana's landscape. This course covers some general principles of geoscience, the earth materials of Indiana, the geologic processes found in Indiana, and the interactions of humans and the environment in Indiana.  Topics include:
    • The geologic history of Indiana including bedrock formation, glaciation, and karst processes.
    • Explanations of the varied landscapes across the state and the geologic process that created these landscapes.
    • Fossils of Indiana and explanations of their environment of formation int he geologic past.
    • Mineral resources of Indiana including limestone, coal, ores, and petroleum.
    • Virtual tours of underground mines, coal mines, an aerial tour of southern Indiana, and a tour of several state parks.
  • Prerequisites: none
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, SummerI
  • Instructors: Jennifer Nelson

GEOL-G 136 Indiana Geology Laboratory

  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Course Summary: Online class that provides field experiences and practical exercises in applying geologic principles and observing the geologic phenomena of Indiana. Topics include sedimentary rocks and fossils, soils, mineral resources, hydrology, glacial history, and karst topography. Students will complete laboratory exercises from a workbook using online guides, and will visit multiple park areas, complete problem solving or hands-on exercises, and submit written reports.
  • NOTE: Summer offering of this course runs over both Summer I and Summer II sessions.
  • Prerequisites: Currently taking or have taken G135 or G110.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • Instructors: Jennifer Nelson
  • Course Links: Online Course Information

GEOL-G 180 Dinosaurs

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: A survey of the characteristics and evolution of dinosaurs. Topics include: occurrence of dinosaur remains in the fossil record, basic anatomy, principles used in classification, types of predatory and plant-eating dinosaurs, environments occupied during life, biology and behavior, extinction theories, dinosaur hunters, and dinosaurs in the media and the public eye.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring

GEOL-G 199 Service Learning in Geology

  • Credit Hours: 1
  • Course Summary: Students participate in a choice of community service projects offered through the Center for Earth and Environmental Sciences at IUPUI. The G199 course consists of participating in five half-day environmental service learning projects with the IUPUI Center for Earth and Environmental Science (CEES). The CEES Environmental Service Learning project schedule and registration information can be found at: HTTP://WWW.CEES.IUPUI.EDU/EDUCATION/ENVIRONMENTAL-SERVICE-LE ARNING-UNDERGRAD. At least six dates for service learning project dates are normally set by the first day of the second week of classes; occasionally, events are added depending on demand from students and needs of our community partners. Please review the service leaning schedule, select your   projects and register for them online. You must be able to attend at least 5 of the scheduled half-day sessions; note that projects may be rescheduled due to weather or unforeseen circumstances by our community partners. Therefore, you    should be available for back-up dates. After completing the service learning projects (including project specific reflections), G199 students will complete a 3-5 page paper outlining the overarching themes of the service learning projects and the projects' relationships to environmental stewardship.  At the start of class, notify the instructor and also send an email to cees@iupui.edu that you will be enrolling in the G199 and registering for five service learning events.  You do not need to meet with the instructor before enrolling in the events. This class meets the SERVICE LEARNING standard of the IUPUI  RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning).  
  • Prerequisites: G107, G110, G115, or G135.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring
  • Instructors: Pierre-Andre Jacinthe , Victoria Schmalhofer
  • Additional Information: This class meets the service learning standard of the IUPUI RISE challenge (research, international study, service and Experiential learning). 

GEOL-G 205 Reporting Skills in Geoscience

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Techniques of presenting written and oral reports from the geoscience approach. The written report: mechanics of format and illustrations, proper citation of geoscience literature, the abstract, proofreading, and editing. The oral report: effective presentation and response to audience questions, simulating a professional science meeting.
  • Prerequisites: G110, G120 and ENG W131.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring
  • Instructors: Jennifer Nelson

GEOL-G 221 Introductory Mineralogy

  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Summary: Crystallography: symmetry, morphology, classes. Mineral chemistry, physics, and genesis. Description, identification, association, occurrence, and use of common and important minerals.
  • Prerequisites: G110, G120 and CHEM C105.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall
  • Instructors: Catherine A. Macris 
 

GEOL-G 222 Introductory Petrology

  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Summary: Igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks: composition, field occurrence, characteristics, classification, origin, laboratory description, and identification.
  • Prerequisites: G221 and CHEM C106
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring
  • Instructors: Andrew Barth

GEOL-G 304 Principles of Paleontology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Biological principles applied to the fossil record. Examination of the quality of the fossil record, taxonomic principles and procedures, analytical techniques, evolutionary theory, evolution and paleoecology of species, populations and communities, diversification and extinction, paleogeography. Laboratories: systematics, stratigraphic distribution, and ecology of major fossilized invertebrate phyla.
  • Prerequisites: G119 or G335 or consent of instructor
  • Semester(s) Offered: Not Currently Offered

GEOL-G 306 Earth Materials

  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Summary: The physical and chemical properties of Earth materials, and the chemical processes that have altered them to cause Earth to evolve to its present state. This course covers properties of minerals and their identification, genesis of igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rocks, interactions between solid Earth and the hydrosphere, and interactions between humans and the solid Earth.
  • Prerequisites: G110, G120 and CHEM C105
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring
  • Instructors: Gregory K Druschel

GEOL-G 323 Structural Geology

  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Summary: Nature and origin of primary and secondary structural features of the earth's crust, with emphasis on mechanics of deformation and origin, and three-dimensional problems illustrating structural concepts. Laboratory.
  • Prerequisites: G205, G222, and G335
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall
  • Instructors: Andrew Barth

GEOL-G 334 Principles of Sedimentation and Stratigraphy

  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Summary: Processes and factors influencing genesis of sedimentary particles and their deposition. Interpretation of depositional environments. Sedimentary facies and interpretation of stratigraphic record from outcrop, core sequence, and remote sensing. Laboratory. Required field trips.
  • Prerequisites: BS and BA Geology Students: G205, G222, and G335 or consent of instructor. For BSES Students: G205 and G306, or consent of instructor
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall
  • Instructors: Kathy Licht

GEOL-G 335 Evolution of Earth and Life

  • Credit Hours: 4
  • Course Summary: Evidence for evolution of the Earth and life in the rock record, Sequence of events, time of occurrence, rates of change.  Interrelationships of principal themes: chemical evolution of the planet, evolution of the biosphere, plate tectonics, mountain building, and sea level changes.  Bearing of evolution on human welfare.
  • Prerequisites: GEOL-G110, GEOL-G120
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall
  • Instructors: Joseph F. Pachut

GEOL-G 403 Optical Mineralogy and Petrography

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Identification of rock-forming minerals in fragments and thin sections using principles of optical crystallography and the petrographic microscope. Description of common igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks and interpretation of their genesis using hand specimens and thin sections.
  • Prerequisites: G205 and G222
  • Semester(s) Offered: Not Currently Offered

GEOL-G 404 Geobiology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Principles of paleontology. Emphasis on invertebrates. Major patterns and fundamentals of biological evolution as revealed by the fossil record. Use of fossils in the study of stratigraphy and Earth's history. Laboratory exercises examine the form, ecology, and stratigraphic record of major phyla with a fossil record.
  • Prerequisites: G205, G119, and G222, and BIOL K101 or BIOL K103 or BIOL N107, or consent of instructor.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Not Currently Offered

GEOL-G 406 Introduction to Geochemistry

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Interactions between geology, chemistry, and biology in natural systems. Explores biogeochemical processes on small scales and in terms of global cycles, as well as human impacts on biogeochemical cycling. Required research project integrating geochemical principles learned with a specific research topic.
  • Prerequisites: G205, CHEM C106, or consent of instructor.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall
  • Instructors: Gregory K Druschel

GEOL-G 410 Undergraduate Research in Geology

  • Credit Hours: 1-3
  • Course Summary: Field and laboratory research in selected problems in geology. May be repeated. A total of 3 credit hours may be applied toward the degree.
  • Prerequisites: G205, junior standing, and consent of instructor.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • Additional Information: This class meets the Research standard of the IUPUI RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning). 

GEOL-G 413 Introduction to Geophysics

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Applications of gravity, magnetics, seismology, electricity, and other methods of mineral exploration, engineering, and environmental investigations.
  • Prerequisites: G205 and consent of instructor.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Not Currently Offered

GEOL-G 415 Principles of Geomorphology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Natural processes that create landforms and landscapes. Physics and chemistry of weathering and soil formation. Dynamics of mass wasting, streams, and glaciers. Includes field and laboratory investigations.
  • Prerequisites: G205, and G222. P or C: G334
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring
  • Instructors: Broxton Bird
  • Additional Information: This class meets the Research standard of the IUPUI RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning). 

GEOL-G 416 Economic Geology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Origin, geologic occurrence, distribution, use, and conservation of important geologic natural resources: metallic minerals; industrial minerals and rocks; coal, petroleum, natural gas, and other energy resources.
  • Prerequisites: G205 and G222; or consent of instructor
  • Semester(s) Offered: Not Currently Offered

GEOL-G 418 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: The petrogenesis of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Both lecture and laboratory portions of the course will stress the application of modern petrographic, mineralogic, geochemical, and phase equilibria techniques to the solution of relevant petrologic problems.
  • Prerequisites: G222 or equivalent.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Not Currently Offered

GEOL-G 420 Regional Geology Field Trip

  • Credit Hours: 0-3
  • Course Summary: Field trip to selected regions for study of mineralogic, lithologic, stratigraphic, structural, paleontologic, geomorphologic, or other geological relationships.
  • Prerequisites: G205 and G323, or consent of instructor
  • Semester(s) Offered: Summer(O)
  • Instructors: Andrew Barth

GEOL-G 430 Principles of Hydrology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: An introduction to the hydrologic cycle, reviewing processes such as precipitation, evaporation and transpiration, infiltration, runoff, streamflow and watersheds, and groundwater.
  • Prerequisites: G205, G117 or G120, MATH 15400, CHEM C106, PHYS P201 or PHYS 15200 or PHYS 21800, and introductory biology.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall
  • Instructors: Lixin Wang

GEOL-G 431 Wetland Ecosystems

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Wetland ecosystems will explore wetlands and their role in ecosystem function. Topics will encompass wetland definitions, geomorphic setting, functions and values, hydrology, vegetation and soils, wetland biogeochemistry, and wetland mitigation and the regulatory framework in which wetlands are treated. The course evaluates the status and trends of Indiana wetlands and types of wetlands common in Indiana.
  • Prerequisites: G430 or G451.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall(Odd)

GEOL-G 432 Stream Ecosystems

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: An examination of the physical, chemical, and biological components of stream ecosystems. Fundamentals of ecosystems science are introduced. Methods for measurement, characterization, and evaluation of the physical, chemical, and biological components of stream ecosystems are taught in field and laboratory applications. Topics include fluvial geomorphology, streamflow, stream chemistry, ecosystem dynamics, water use and management, human impacts, and stream restoration.
  • Prerequisites: G205, G117 or G120, MATH 15400, CHEM C106, PHYS P201 or PHYS 15200 or PHYS 21800, and introductory biology
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall(Even)

GEOL-G 436 Earth Observation from Space

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: This course is designed to introduce junior undergraduates and first year graduate students to Earth observation with sensing are described.  Elements of airborne and satellite remote sensing images necessary for basic data analysis and qualitative image interpretation are covered.  Remaining lectures are dedicated to classical applications of airborne and satellite remote sensing in exploring natural world and physical Earth.  The class explores in greater detail how space observations can be used to monitor and assess environmental change and to address society need.  The class includes lab assignments on basic remote sensing and data interpretation.  Through this course training, students are expected to perform basic remote sensing applications in agriculture and forest ecology, hydrology and soil sciences, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, urban landscapes, and physical geology.
  • Prerequisites: G110 or G107 or equivalent
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall
  • Instructors: Lin Li

GEOL-G 445 Applied Analytical Techniques in Geology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Principles of advanced analytical techniques, including X-ray analysis, electron beam imaging and analysis, and mass spectrometry, with applications in geosciences. Lectures on theory followed by laboratory exercises. Students will complete individual or collaborative research projects.
  • Prerequisites: G221, CHEM C105-C106, and consent of instructor
  • Semester(s) Offered: Not Currently Offered

GEOL-G 447 Planetary Geology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Origin and evolution of planets. The roles of impacts and volcanism in surface dynamics, and the role of water in planetary climates.
  • Prerequisites: G110 or equivalent course, or consent of instructor.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring(Odd)
  • Instructors: Lin Li

GEOL-G 451 Principles of Hydrogeology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Geologic and hydrologic factors controlling the occurrence and dynamics of groundwater. Emphasis on basic physical and chemical relationships between water and geologic material.
  • Prerequisites: G205 AND G110 OR G107, MATH 22200, CHEM 106 AND PHYS 152 OR PHYS-P201 OR PHYS 21800
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring
  • Instructors: Marty Risch 
  • Additional Information: This class meets the RESEARCH standard of the IUPUI RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning). 

GEOL-G 460 Internship in Geology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Industrial or similar experiences in geologically oriented employment. Projects jointly arranged, coordinated, and evaluated by faculty and industrial/governmental supervisors.
  • Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, and consent of faculty mentor
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • Additional Information: This class meets the Experiential standard of the IUPUI RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning).  

GEOL-G 482 Environmental Microbiology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: This class will cover basic concepts in microbiology, such as the taxonomy and cell structure of Bacteria and Archea, microbial growth and energetics, how these pathways then control global biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and various metals in in terrestrial and aqueous environments.
  • Prerequisites: Biol-K 101, Biol-K 103 or instructor consent.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring
  • Instructors: Kevin Mandernack
  • Additional Information: This class meets the Experiential standard of the IUPUI RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning). 

GEOL-G 483 Isotope Geochemistry

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Introduction to the theory and application of radiogenic and stable isotopes to a variety of subdisciplines in the earth sciences. Topics include geochronology, tracers, mass balance and mixing, hydrology and environmental applications, water-rock interaction, and biogeochemical cycles.
  • Prerequisites: G406 or consent of instructor
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring(Odd)
  • Instructors: William P Gilhooly III

GEOL-G 486 Soil Biogeochemistry

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Biological and geochemical processes controlling the cycling of elements in soils and freshwater sediments with emphasis on cycles of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorous.
  • Prerequisites: G406, or consent of instructor
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall

GEOL-G 487 Remote Sensing of Global Change

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: This course is designed to introduce senior undergraduates and junior graduate students to the methods and strategies underlying the application of hyperspectral remote sensing in solving environmental problems in the context of global change. Basic physics for remote sensing is described.Terminologies for spectroscopic analysis and image interpretation of environment changes variables with visible and near-infrared wavelengths and thermal infrared data are introduced. Classical examples on applications of hyperspectral remote sensing in agricultural and forest ecology, hydrology and soil sciences, terrestrial and aquatic ecology, atmosphere and urban landscapes will be discussed.
  • Prerequisites: GEOL-G222, GEOG-G336 and PHYS-P202 or equivalents
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring(Even)
  • Instructors: Lin Li
  • Additional Information: This class meets the Experiential standard of the IUPUI RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning). 

GEOL-G 488 Global Cycles

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: The global environment is dominated by interlinking cycles of earth materials, chemicals, and biological components. This course will explore the major elements of the geochemical cycles found in the atmosphere, land, lakes, river, biota, and oceans, as well as the human impacts on these cycles. This course will take a global approach to geochemistry and environmental problems and will introduce fundamental concepts of meteorology, surficial geology (weathering, erosion, and sedimentation ), biogeochemistry, limnology, and oceanography.
  • Prerequisites: GEOL-G 110, one semester of chemistry, one semester of biology
  • Semester(s) Offered: Spring
  • Instructors: Gabriel Filippelli
  • Additional Information: This class meets the Experiential standard of the IUPUI RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning). 

GEOL-G 490 Undergraduate Seminar in Geology

  • Credit Hours: 1-3
  • Course Summary: Readings and discussion of selected topics. May be repeated, provided different topics are studied, for a maximum of 6 credit hours.
  • Prerequisites: junior or senior standing and consent of instructor.
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring

GEOL-G 495 Senior Thesis in Geology

  • Credit Hours: 3
  • Course Summary: Capstone experience involving a research project. Students must identify a faculty mentor for this course. Written report and/or presentation required.
  • Prerequisites: Senior class standing
  • Semester(s) Offered: Fall, Spring, Summer
  • Additional Information: This class meets the Experiential standard of the IUPUI RISE Challenge (Research, International Study, Service and Experiential Learning). 

Glacial expert delivers Antarctic science to Indiana classrooms

Kathy Licht Ph.D. Earth Science, Associate Professor